Nature

The Nature Conservancy: Can Dogs Help Find and Save Endangered Species?

Rogue, a four-year-old belgian sheepdog, helps The Nature Conservancy find endangered plants in Oregon. Photo Β© Jen Newlin Bell/TNC.

Rogue prefers his steak medium-well. But when it comes to sniffing out a rare plant, this dog performs work that’s very well done, indeed.

The 4-year-old Belgian sheepdog is part of a Nature Conservancy collaborative project to test the efficacy of using dogs to sniff out the threatened Kincaid’s lupine. The plant is host to the endangered Fender’s blue butterfly, found only in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.

Watch a video of Rogue in action!

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The Nature Conservancy: 320,000 Acres of Forest Protected in Landmark Deal

Few places on Earth are as untouched as the "Crown of the Continent" — a 10-million-acre expanse of mountains, valleys and prairies in Montana and Canada. The area has sustained all the same species — including grizzlies, lynx, moose and bull trout — for at least 200 years.

Now — in one of the most significant conservation sales in history — The Nature Conservancy and The Trust for Public Land have preserved 320,000 acres of forestlands in western Montana that provide valuable habitat for species in the Crown of the Continent.

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Scientists Use GPS to Spy on Whale Watch Tours, Uncover Ugly Secret

Approximately 1 million people paid for tickets to go on whale watching cruises off the coast of Massachusetts and Maine in 2006. These sales generated around $21 million dollars for the companies who operate the boats: no small change. While the public might have been enjoying the experience of seeing and learning more about endangered

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Human Interaction with Nature: Recovery Efforts for Endangered Species

Editor’s note: The fourth part of the “Human Interaction with Nature” series takes a look at efforts to recover endangered animal species. This post was written by Denzyl Janneker, and originally published on Friday, May 9, 2008. Baraboo, Wisconsin and Basra, Iraq might have nothing in common, but fighting a war and killing endangered species

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