Reforesting the Tropics, Providing Jobs, and Sequestering Carbon: A Trifecta of Sustainability

Published on March 6th, 2017 | by

2 months ago by

While there are a lot of moving parts to the global economy, I’d argue that there is one fundamental premise that will have, hand’s down, the greatest influence in determining the fate of humanity, and that is the time horizon of strategizing a particular activity—short term vs. long term thinking. Take any industry, whether it’s […] read more

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Approves Poison Targeting Wild Hogs

Published on February 28th, 2017 | by

2 months ago by

The Texas Agriculture Commissioner, Sid Miller, has approved a new poison specifically intended for use against wild hogs known as Kaput Feral Hog Lure. The approval has resulted in the creation of a petition on Change.org calling for the approval to be rescinded. As some background here, the new poison includes warfarin — often used […] read more

Documentary Aims To Tell Ultimate Story Of NM’s Gila River Through The Eyes Of 3 Young Environmentalists

Published on February 23rd, 2017 | by

2 months ago by

The Gila River, one of the last wild rivers in the western US, is under threat from proposals for development and diversion. The Heart of the Gila documentary promises to deliver a compelling visual journey along the Gila, while also educating us about the importance of using good science and hard data to make the […] read more

Forest Elephant Populations Have Seen An ~80% Decline In Central Africa’s Most Important Preserve Because Of Poaching

Published on February 22nd, 2017 | by

2 months ago by

Forest elephant populations in Central Africa’s most important nature preserve, Gabon’s Minkébé National Park, have declined by between 78^ and 81% over recent times as a result of poaching, new research from Duke University has found. So, even in Central Africa’s largest nature preserve, poaching is still enough of a problem that forest elephants are […] read more

Outsourcing Green Jobs: Less Feasible than Traditional Jobs?

Published on February 20th, 2017 | by

3 months ago by

In a week that’s seen a Secretary of Labor nominee step away due to controversy over his fast-food company’s practice of relocating technology jobs to the Philippines, the topic of outsourcing jobs is high in the news cycle. Fears of lackluster trade, isolationist policies that result in protectionist measures, and discourse that embraces nationalistic and xenophobic […] read more

‘Kombit’ Documents the Struggle to Reforest Haiti (Film Review)

Published on January 31st, 2017 | by

3 months ago by

We were recently treated to a preview screening of the film “Kombit” which unpacks the work being done by way of a partnership between the non-profit “Smallholder Farmers Alliance” and the Timberland company in Haiti. Haiti has a major issue with deforestation with over 98% of the nation stripped of trees as a direct result of […] read more

Noted Anti-Deforestation Activist Isidro Baldenegro Murdered In Chihuahua (Mexico)

Published on January 20th, 2017 | by

4 months ago by

The noted anti-deforestation and environmental rights activist Isidro Baldenegro was murdered in the northern state of Chihuahua in Mexico on Sunday. Baldenegro was killed by gunmen who subsequently fled the scene, one of which has reportedly been identified but not yet detained. The murder follows not too long after the March 2016 murder of the […] read more

EcoJustice Expected To Rise Under Donald Trump

Published on January 5th, 2017 | by

4 months ago by

Originally published on EdenKeeper.org Creation Care leaders are predicting the coming Trump presidency will prompt more ecojustice activism, including non-violent civil disobedience, within US faith communities. Writing for Baptist News, Jeff Brumley states that “Faith-based protests of pipeline projects, global warming and other environmental causes won’t just be for the hard core anymore, thanks to […] read more

Giraffe Numbers Have Fallen By ~40% Over The Last 30 Years, IUCN Reports

Published on January 3rd, 2017 | by

4 months ago by

In conjunction with the decline of practically every other megafauna animal still in the world, giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) numbers have fallen by around 40% over just the last 30 years, according to new data from the IUCN. To put that quantitatively — there were between 151,702-163,452 giraffes in 1985; and around 97,562 giraffes in 2015. […] read more

Ring-Tailed Lemurs Declining Rapidly, Now Fewer Than 2,500 Left, Research Finds

Published on January 3rd, 2017 | by

4 months ago by

The iconic ring-tailed lemur of Madagascar (the only place that the primates known as “true lemurs” have ever existed) is rapidly headed towards extinction, according to new research from the University of Victoria in British Columbia and CU Boulder. The research found that as a result of growing levels of: habitat destruction, deforestation, open-pit mining, […] read more

Only 7,100 Cheetahs Left In The World, Study Finds

Published on January 1st, 2017 | by

4 months ago by

There are now only 7,100 cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) left in the world, according to a new study from the Zoological Society of London, Panthera, and the Wildlife Conservation Society. The causes? The same ones as always — habitat loss and fragmentation, the “pet” trade, desertification (often driven by deforestation), and the over hunting of prey […] read more

Deforestation By “Subsistence” Farmers In Congo Driven By Money-Making Not Self-Sufficiency, Only Very Small Portion Of Population Responsible For Most Deforestation, Research Finds

Published on December 27th, 2016 | by

4 months ago by

Despite some common presumptions on the matter, it seems that most deforestation occurring in the Congo Basin is the result of only a small share of locals, and those that are taking part aren’t doing so for self-sufficiency but rather to “increase their quality of life,” according to a new study from the University of […] read more

Calatrava’s Iconic Sundial Bridge was Spawned by Salmon

Published on December 19th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

Originally published on Green Building Elements Spawned by the need to protect a seemingly insignificant patch of gravel, not many folks know that Redding’s iconic Sundial Bridge rose as a result of an eco-challenge surmountable only by architect Santiago Calatrava’s sensitive and innovative expertise. Abandoned since the long-gone days of mining in Redding, California, submerged […] read more

Solarize with Faith Program is Energizing Connecticut

Published on December 15th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

Originally published on EdenKeeper.org A community outreach program in Connecticut called Solarize with Faith is helping faith group members display their creation care by putting solar on their roofs. Their beautiful motto? “Stewardship in our hearts. Solar on our roofs.” What is Solarize With Faith? “Sparked” by the Connecticut Green Bank, Solarize with Faith is […] read more

Ocean Acidification May Cause Cascading Loss Of Biodiversity In Some Marine Habitats, Research Finds

Published on December 7th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

The ocean acidification that’s now occurring, as a result of increasing anthropogenic levels of carbon dioxide emissions, will led to cascading losses of biodiversity in many marine habitats and ecosystems, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and its partners. The new work is some of the first to investigate the likely […] read more

Corals Grow To Be Much, Much Older Than Previously Assumed, Research Finds — Implications Relating To Ocean Acidification & Coral Bleaching Events

Published on December 6th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

Specific coral genotypes (“individuals”) can live for more than 5,000 years (at the least) according to new research from the National Marine Fisheries Service, Penn State, and Dial Cordy & Associates. The findings — based on research focused on elkhorn corals (Acropora palmata) living around Florida and in the Caribbean — mean that corals are […] read more

How Green Fest Hopes to Reach Carbon Neutrality with Carbon Credit Capital

Published on December 5th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

Most people know about renewable energy in the form of solar, wind or geothermal power, for example, and the biggest and best firms in the world are pouring resources towards finding better ways to produce longer lasting products with less input. Little is being done, however, to foster a strong network of projects that reduce greenhouse […] read more

Mothman Sighting – Picture Taken In Point Pleasant, West Virginia, True Or Hoax?

Published on December 5th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

The mothman, the giant supposedly human-like flying creature first spotted in Point Pleasant, West Virginia back in the 1960s has made its return to the popular consciousness once again it seems — with images recently taken (on 20 November 2016) by an unidentified man now making the rounds on the internet. While certainly nowhere near […] read more

Hogwarts School (aka Gloucester Cathedral in UK) Goes Solar

Published on December 5th, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

Originally published on EdenKeeper.org Formally blessed and sanctified, 150 solar panels forming a 38 kW array have been pressed into religious service at the iconic Gloucester Cathedral in Gloucestershire, England. Dubbed the oldest cathedral in the world to install solar panels, the new photovoltaic system will help reduce the ancient cathedral’s energy costs by 25%. […] read more

US Passenger Vehicle Emissions Comparable To 1980 Mt. St Helens Eruption Occurring Every 3 Days

Published on December 2nd, 2016 | by

5 months ago by

The USGS estimates that 10 million tons of CO2 was released over the 9 hour eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. That’s a pretty huge number, but passenger vehicles in the USA alone emit as much CO2 as a Mt St. Helens eruption happening somewhere in America every 3 days. read more