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Disasters & Extreme WeatherGlobal WarmingScience

NOAA: 2010 Tied for Hottest Year on Record

2010 global temperature anomalies compared to 1961-1990 average. (click to enlarge)

How many times have you heard that climatologists can’t predict climate because weathermen can’t predict the weather. Plenty if you follow the issue like I do. But just as some prominent climatologists predicted, 2010 was the hottest year on record. That’s what NOAA’s data, the first to come out for the 2010 calendar year, show… (as already covered in December, the 2010 meteorological year was the hottest on record according to NASA.

“It was the 34th-consecutive year that the global temperature was above average, according to the data center,” USA TODAY notes. “The last below-average year was 1976.”

2010 global temperatures anomalies compared to 1971-2000 average. (click to enlarge)

Here’s more on “Global Highlights” from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the NOAA:

  • For 2010, the combined global land and ocean surface temperature tied with 2005 as the warmest such period on record, at 0.62°C (1.12°F) above the 20th century average of 13.9°C (57.0°F). 1998 is the third warmest year-to-date on record, at 0.60°C (1.08°F) above the 20th century average.
  • The 2010 Northern Hemisphere combined global land and ocean surface temperature was the warmest year on record, at 0.73°C (1.31°F) above the 20th century average. The 2010 Southern Hemisphere combined global land and ocean surface temperature was the sixth warmest year on record, at 0.51°C (0.92°F) above the 20th century average.
  • The global land surface temperature for 2010 tied with 2005 as the second warmest on record, at 0.96°C (1.73°F) above the 20th century average. The warmest such period on record occurred in 2007, at 0.99°C (1.78°F) above the 20th century average.
  • The global ocean surface temperature for 2010 tied with 2005 as the third warmest on record, at 0.49°C (0.88°F) above the 20th century average.
  • In 2010 there was a dramatic shift in the El Niño–Southern Oscillation, which influences temperature and precipitation patterns around the world. A moderate-to-strong El Niño at the beginning of the year transitioned to La Niña conditions by July. At the end of November, La Niña was moderate-to-strong.
2010 climate anomalies and significant events. (click to make HUGE & can make even larger on the NOAA website)

The NCDC has much more info in its annual state of the climate global analysis, including info on regional temperatures and on global precipitation and extreme weather events.

h/t Climate Denial Crock of the Week




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