Business abb solar farm nevada

Published on September 21st, 2014 | by Zachary Shahan

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Solar Panels Cost Less Than Electricity From Natural Gas In US

September 21st, 2014 by




A new report out from Lazard tells us something those who follow the wind and solar industries already knew to some degree: large-scale solar and wind power projects can now compete purely on cost with natural gas power plants (as well as coal and nuclear, of course). Solar panels cost less than electricity from any other source in some regions, and the cost continues to fall.

We’ve seen solar come in lower than natural gas in Austin, Minnesota, and probably New Mexico. The city of Austin has actually made solar power a “default energy source” now.

Wind power, meanwhile, is often the cheapest option for new electricity generation capacity. However, it often produces electricity in the middle of the night, complementing solar panels.

Worth noting is that this has long been the case with renewable energy subsidies, but the point of the report is that it’s also the case without those subsidies in a growing number of places, even while fossil fuels retain their subsidies.

abb solar farm nevada


 

The new report from Lazard notes that onshore (unsubsidized) wind power costs have fallen from a low of $101/MWh in 2009 to $37/MWh in 2014, a drop of approximately 65%.

Solar farm costs have fallen from a low of $323/MWh in 2009 to $72/MWh in 2014, a drop of approximately 80%.

Rooftop solar panels cost much more (per kWh) than utility-scale solar panel setups, but the important thing is that rooftop solar panel costs compete with retail electricity prices rather than wholesale electricity prices coming from large power plants. While solar farms are just hitting “grid parity,” more-expensive rooftop solar panels have been at “socket parity” for millions or hundreds of millions of Americans for years.

Is the cost of solar panels going to fall further? Of course it is, but every year that you wait to go solar, you pass up massive savings off of your electricity bill. Also, solar panel subsidies at the federal, state, and local levels won’t last forever, so taking advantage of them now is quite logical. In my opinion, for many people, there’s no better time to go solar than right now.

Image Credit: Solar Farm in Nevada by Zachary Shahan | CleanTechnica (CC BY-SA 4.0 license)

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • Richard Ilaner

    Why pay a huge amount like $1000’s for utilization of solar or wind power when you can have the opportunity to build your own home made solar system for less than $200. You can Learn more on http://inplix.com

    • fogjoseph

      Good place, I try it

  • Joshua

    $72/MWH is not cheaper than natural gas energy production. Right now an old combined cycle running at a 9000-10000 average heat rate would have production costs around $40/MWH.

    • Old Yeller

      That’s not a fair comparison. An old solar farm has a cost of production close to zero. All you pay for is some maintenance. To be fair you should always compare the cost of new fossil fuel generation with new solar generation.

  • ronwint

    Be careful making any comments here because old Bob Wallace is on the prowl and will probably draw you into an argument and then delete your comment.

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