US Disasters in 2011 Set New Record

Published on September 27th, 2011 | by

September 27th, 2011 by

us natural disasters

Yep, that’s a graph of U.S. disasters according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Looks a bit like the graphs of greenhouse gas emissions, doesn’t it? Looks completely opposite the trend of Arctic sea ice. Strange…

Of course, the GOP has been trying to either cut FEMA disaster relief funding or clean energy funding (not oil subsidies). Nice way to keep the U.S. suffering!

Here’s more from a previous post:

It seems like a story out of fantasy land. Members of the GOP in the House of Representatives do not want add to spending by funding critical disaster relief after Hurricane Irene, so they are trying to cut funding to advance the development of clean vehicles (which, of course, are critical to cutting global warming and limiting the billion-dollar disasters we see in the future).

And from another:

So, last week House Speaker John Boehner insisted he was willing to shut down the government unless we kill a loan program that helps Detroit automakers retool factories to make hybrid cars that had created 40,000 jobs. (Note: That’s a loan program, not a give-away program.)

The House passed the bill on Friday and then left town. Since the government will run out of money on September 30 unless this bill is passed, that left it up to the Senate – pass it Boehner’s way, or take the blame for the shutdown. And since the Democrats have caved on just about everything in the past year, Boehner probably figured there was a good chance they’d just cave again.

Senate leader Harry Reid may have found a little bit o’ backbone, though. He’s started the bizarre parliamentary dance required (under Senate rules) to lob the ball back at the House… WITHOUT the odious job-killing green-car cut.

Will it work? Who knows?

How can you help?

Take Action:

 


Keep up to date with all the most interesting green news on the planet by subscribing to our (free) Planetsave newsletter.






  • Our politicians have been defining disaster down. Just because a disaster is “declared” does not in fact mean that the threshold for what constitutes a disaster has occurred.

    Jack Blair
    InfoQuarter
    Hoboken, NJ