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Tag: sea level

Ancient Tides Are Sometimes Dramatically Different Than Today

Often thought to be one of the more stable processes on Earth, the rise and fall of the tides, have turned out to be as unpredictable as anything else, when considered over a longer time frame. This, from new research which suggests that shows how tides have changed dramatically over thousands of years.

Greenland More Stable than Antarctica

“If West Antarctica collapsed, that means it’s more unstable than we expected, which is quite scary,” said a scientist who set out to determine whether Greenland or Antarctica will introduce more melting water to rising sea levels.

Strong El Nino Might Mean Increased Sea Levels and Storm Surges

A new study conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) along East Coast communities in America has found that they may be at risk to higher sea levels accompanied by more destructive storm surges in future El NiΓ±o years.

Rising Ocean Levels A Long Term Problem

A new study has shown that not only does melting ice contribute more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion, but that ocean levels are likely to continue rising well after the warming of the atmosphere stabilises.

Melting Islands Play Big Part in Sea Level Rise

A new study led by a University of Michigan researcher has shown that the melting glaciers and ice caps on Canadian Arctic islands are playing a much greater role in the rise of global sea levels than had previously been assumed.

West Antarctic Ice Sheet More Stable than Previously Thought

In many climate models and scientists’ theories the West Antarctic ice sheet is expected to melt over the coming hundreds of years and raise the sea levels. Much of this is based on the theory that during the last interglacial period the ice sheet must have melted in order to raise the sea levels as much as they had been. However new research suggests that the West Antarctic ice sheet may be more stable than had been previously realised.