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Tag: National Weather Service

From New York to Maryland, 100,000 Ordered to Evacuate their Homes because of Flooding

Still recovering from Hurricane Irene, the East Coast is being hit again by remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Rain comes on and off for the East Coast, sometimes only drizzling, but the rivers and streams continue to rise. Among many of the areas flooded are the many towns along the Susquehanna River. Rural towns are nestled along 444 miles of water that lead down into the Chesapeake Bay. As water surged over flood walls built decades ago to protect residences from potential flooding from the Susquehanna River, 20,000 people were ordered to head for higher ground. This is said to be the worst flooding in the history of Binghamton, at least since the flood walls were built in the 1930s and ’40s. Besides the town of Binghamton, nearly 100,000 people from New York to Maryland were ordered to flee the rising Susquehanna River on Thursday.

Snow Holding On in Uinta Mountains

By this time of year, the snow on the Uinta Mountains in Utah have normally given way to grass and wildflowers, but not this year, as is shown in the image below which was taken by the Landsat 5 satellite on July 15.

America Set to Suffer Continued Flooding Through Summer

The American Midwest and northern Plains are preparing for continued flooding, with the threat of above average rainfall expected to continue through the summer, says the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service, who believe that flooding this year could rival the Great Flood of 1993.

Videos and Photos from the Mississippi Flooding

The Mississippi River reached 47.87 feet (14.59 meters) in Memphis, Tennessee, on May 10, 2011, according to the Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service (AHPS) of the U.S. National Weather Service. The photos and videos below show just how far-reaching the flooding of the Mississippi River is.

Cold Front Sweeps Over US East Coast

NASA’s GOES-13 satellite captured the below image of a very strong cold front moving across the US East Coast on April 5, at approximately 10:31 am, EDT, (1431 UDT).