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Tag: ice sheet

Rising Ocean Levels A Long Term Problem

A new study has shown that not only does melting ice contribute more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion, but that ocean levels are likely to continue rising well after the warming of the atmosphere stabilises.

Understanding Melting Glaciers and the Oceans

Focusing their attention on the collapse of the Barents ice sheet which took place some 140,000 years ago, scientists from Bangor University and the University of Sheffield have used a computer climate model to understand how different states of freshwater entering the oceans affect the circulation of the oceans.

Looking to the Past to Understand the Future of Sea Level Rise

More and more the history of our planet is being used to help us understand the future of our planet. Scientists from Boston University have recently published their findings of the mid-Pliocene climate optimum period 3 million years ago, and the similarities it could hold for the future centuries of our planet.

Turning Antarctic Ice-Making Upside Down

New evidence provided by researchers flying over East Antarctica’s Gamburtsev Mountain’s between November 2008 to January 2009 has shown that there is ice forming at the bottom of the massive ice sheets that cover Antarctica, as well as on the top.

West Antarctic Ice Sheet More Stable than Previously Thought

In many climate models and scientists’ theories the West Antarctic ice sheet is expected to melt over the coming hundreds of years and raise the sea levels. Much of this is based on the theory that during the last interglacial period the ice sheet must have melted in order to raise the sea levels as much as they had been. However new research suggests that the West Antarctic ice sheet may be more stable than had been previously realised.

Satellites, GPS Capture Migrating Greenland Ice Cover Loss [VIDEO]

According to a recently published paper in the journal Geophysical Research Letters (Khan et al), Greenland’s ice mass loss has been accelerating and is now spreading up along its northwest coast, with data indicating the start of this acceleration to be late 2005.