Loading...

Tag: Earth Science

A Billion Years Ago Antarctica was linked to North America

New research from an international team of scientists has provided the strongest yet evidence that Antarctica and North America were once part of the same continent 1.1 billion years ago, well before the super continent of Pangaea was formed.

Greenland Glaciers Shrink Fast and Grow Fast

According to geologists at the University at Buffalo, marine-calving glaciers have the ability to not only shrink rapidly during periods of global warming, but to grow as quickly during periods of global cooling.

New Underwater Volcanoes Discovered in Antarctica

Scientists from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have discovered a slew of previously undiscovered underwater volcanoes in the ocean waters around the remote South Sandwich Islands, a series of islands grouped together with Britain’s claim in Antarctica.

More Rain Means Less Snow Means Faster Arctic Ice Melt

According to new research presented at the XXV International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics General Assembly in Melbourne, Australia, rising temperatures in the Arctic have led to an increase in the amount of rainfall, and thus, a decrease in the amount of snowfall.

Methane Will Wreak Havoc in Changing Climate

A two-part study investigating the impact of methane – one of the most potent of greenhouse gases – has found that millions of tonnes of methane currently frozen in sediment beneath the Arctic Ocean will wreak havoc if released into the oceans.

Investigating the Carbon Impact of Hurricane Damage

There is a source of increased carbon emissions that not many people are looking at; the destruction of trees during a hurricane or other strong storm. Investigating situations such as this are leading scientists to better understand the carbon cycle.

Planetary Crust Acts Like A Yo-Yo

New research out of The Australian National University has recorded for the first time what was once thought to be only theoretical; yo-yo subduction in the Earth’s crust.

Icebergs Are Helping in Previously Unknown Ways

Icebergs have always been majestic objects, and just a little ill-defined, but new research is shedding more and more light on them. In a new discovery that has global implications scientists have discovered that icebergs drifting out to sea leave in their wake an increased level of chlorophyll which in turns increases carbon dioxide absorption.

Earthquake and Tsunami from Space

NASA has been providing a lot of photos and satellite imagery of Japan over the past week, focusing on the devastation that has affected the region surrounding the Sendai region after the magnitude-9 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit. Below are three more images that each show a different picture of the impact the earthquake and tsunami had on the country.

Animated Sequence of Earthquakes

The earthquake which has devastated Japan has been the focus of many this past week, not the least of which are the scientists who are studying the quake and its subsequent tsunami. Geophysicist Joachim Saul from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (Helmholtz Association) created an animation which shows the sequence of quakes since March 9.

Listen to the Japanese Earthquake

The Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB), a unit of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), directed by Professor Michel André, recorded the sound of the earthquake that hit Japan on Friday, March 11, and that recording is now available online to listen to: it is, without a doubt, a unique opportunity.