Browsing the "biology" Tag

First Global 'Camera Trap' Study Reveals Threatened Mammal Species' Lives, Damaged Habitats

August 16th, 2011 | by Michael Ricciardi

With over 50, 000 photos (and counting) capturing over 100 mammal species from seven protected areas across Africa, Asia and the Americas...a global 'hidden camera'' research project is giving conservation biologists a rare glimpse into the ordinary lives of many endangered or threatened mammal species.The camera study, conducted by The Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network (TEAM), is helping to confirm what smaller, isolated studies have indicated: that habitat destruction is jeopardizing the biological integrity and diversity of many of the world's mammals


Humans Have a Lot in Common with Elephants, 40-Year Study Finds

June 20th, 2011 | by Zachary Shahan

Elephants are one of my absolute favorite animals. They are such beautiful, intelligent-seeming creatures. They are so gentle. And they move so gracefully forward, IMHO. Now, the results of a 40-year social behavioral study of elephants show that humans and elephants actually have a ton in common


Lonesome Whale of the Pacific, 'Alice', May Be One of A Kind

April 20th, 2011 | by Michael Ricciardi

Following some strange migratory pattern of its own design, and emitting a plaintive call-song that is never answered, a solitary whale roams the depths of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The call-song has been tracked through NOAA's underwater, sound surveillance system since 1989, when a research team out of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute noticed "whale-like" sounds occurring in the 51.75 Hertz band of the radio spectrum. Amongst the scientists who have faithfully tracked the song since, the mystery whale is known as '52 Hertz', but popularly, "she" is known as Alice


"Super' Bacteria Defy Normal Aging

August 22nd, 2010 | by Michael Ricciardi

In a recent paper entitled 'Robust growth of Escherichia coli', published in the journal Current Biology, researchers discovered that E. coli bacteria are able to maintain a "steady state" growth rate despite the accumulation of genetic errors



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