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Tag: Bangor University

Ocean Currents Impacted Ancient Global Cooling

New research that has been published in the journal Science has showed that the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) may have played a key role in shifting the global climate some 38 million years ago, and provides the first clue that the early ACC may have played a critical part in the formation of the current structure of our oceans.

Understanding Melting Glaciers and the Oceans

Focusing their attention on the collapse of the Barents ice sheet which took place some 140,000 years ago, scientists from Bangor University and the University of Sheffield have used a computer climate model to understand how different states of freshwater entering the oceans affect the circulation of the oceans.

Climate Change Aiding One Antarctic Flowering Plant

Stereotype would have us convinced that Antarctica is a white mass of snow 365 days a year. But summer on the Antarctic Peninsula allows a little bit of green to sprout and add beautiful contrast to what we thought we knew of the region.

And climate change is aiding this progress, for one plant in particular.

More Turbulent Arctic in Our Future

Scientists believe that the more severe winters suffered by the UK over the past few years are a result of disappearing ice in the Arctic sea. A reduction in sea ice, they explain, could be the reason for the colder winters, which up until recently have been insulating temperature changes in the sea from the atmosphere.