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Tag: Atlantic Ocean

Five Thousand Years of Rapid Greenland Climate Changes

Scientists have long known that climate change was happening in West Greenland over the past 5,000 years, but until now they have not been able to quantify the specific conditions of that change. New research has allowed scientists to predict that abrupt temperature changes by as much as 4 or 5 degrees Celsius will have had profound implications for the peoples that occupied western Greenland during that time.

Timid Pacific Hurricane Season Predicted

America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center has predicted a below average pacific hurricane season, with an outlook that calls for a 70% probability of a below average season.

Newfoundland From Space {Photo of the Day}

The Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador was captured blanketed in ice and snow in this image captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite on April the 9th.

Several Hurricane Landfalls Expected for US in 2011

Weather Services International (WSI) have released revised predictions for the number and type of storms for the 2011 storm season emanating from the Atlantic Ocean.

WSI predicts 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes and 4 intense hurricanes rated at category 3 or greater.

Tracking the Japanese Tsunami Debris

Most people will have seen the images depicting the devastating impact of the 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake which destroyed coastal towns along the Japanese east coast near Sendai. Entire villages and communities are gone, along with the lives that inhabited them.

Of less, but still important, concern than the lives lost, is what will happen to all the debris which was washed out to sea as a result of the tsunami.

Projections of just what will happen to the debris have been made by Nikolai Maximenko and Jan Hafner at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s International Pacific Research Center, shown in the animated image below

Complicated Circulation Affects Greenland Glaciers

“People always thought the circulation [in Greenland’s fjords] would be simple: warm waters coming into the fjords at depth, melting the glaciers. Then the mixture of warm water and meltwater rises because it is lighter, and comes out at the top. Nice and neat,” says Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution physical oceanographer Fiamma Straneo, who has now led two survey trips to Sermilik Fjord at the base of Helheim Glacier, Greenland.