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Tag: Antarctic ice sheet

Rising Ocean Levels A Long Term Problem

A new study has shown that not only does melting ice contribute more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion, but that ocean levels are likely to continue rising well after the warming of the atmosphere stabilises.

Climate History of Northern Antarctica Revealed by Fossilized Pollen

By looking at fossilised pollen found below a hundred feet of dense rock off the coast of Northern Antarctica, researchers have been able to reconstruct a climate record for the southern continent, and determine that the last remnant of Antarctic vegetation existed on the continents northern peninsula some 12 million years ago in a tundra landscape similar to that of northern Canada.

Ocean Currents Impacted Ancient Global Cooling

New research that has been published in the journal Science has showed that the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) may have played a key role in shifting the global climate some 38 million years ago, and provides the first clue that the early ACC may have played a critical part in the formation of the current structure of our oceans.

West Antarctic Ice Sheet More Stable than Previously Thought

In many climate models and scientists’ theories the West Antarctic ice sheet is expected to melt over the coming hundreds of years and raise the sea levels. Much of this is based on the theory that during the last interglacial period the ice sheet must have melted in order to raise the sea levels as much as they had been. However new research suggests that the West Antarctic ice sheet may be more stable than had been previously realised.