volcano

Yellowstone Super-Volcano a Little Less Super But More Active

  The Yellowstone “super-volcano” was in the record books for creating the fourth largest eruption known to science. “Was”, because new research has shown that the super-eruption was actually two separate eruptions, which means that the Yellowstone super-volcano is a little less super and a little more frequent. “The Yellowstone volcano’s previous behavior is the

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Supervolcanoes Will Not End Earth in 2012, Probably

In what life was probably like prior to the coming of the year 2000, every man and his dog is coming up with a theory for how the Earth will end come 2012. After already curbing fears that a giant “killer solar flare” will wipe out planet Earth next year, NASA has again weighed in, this time explaining that a supervolcano will not have a supereruption during 2012.

Probably. Let’s get to that later.

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Volcanic Activity at Kilauea

One of Earth’s most active volcanoes, Kilauea, surged to life on March 5 of this year, spewing fresh flows of lava out the opening of a new fissure and starting off a forest fire that has burned for much of this month. NASA’s Advanced Land Imager (ALI) onboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured the following false-color images of the area.

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Mount Etna Erupts

On the 11th of January, Mount Etna, in Sicily, Italy, Europe’s largest volcano, erupted briefly, spewing flames, ash and smoke into the atmosphere and lava down its slopes. The ESA’s Envisat MERIS captured an image of the volcano from above, a trail of smoke drifting to the east. And below is an image found on

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Volcanoes: The 'X Factor' in Climate Change

Apart from the major disruption in flight traffic and the economy, the Icelandic volcano eruption promises in the short-term to disrupt upper atmospheric circulation patterns and temperatures, with an additional impact due to sulfuric acid “nucleation” and subsequent acid rain. But the medium to long-term impacts of continuous, or increasing, volcanic eruptions is a matter of on-going scientific debate.

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