science

Ebola: And Senegal Makes Five

As you may know, PlanetSave posts important health stories as well as the popular science, nature, and climate reports we’re usually known for. (In fact, we’re working toward 500 health posts over these few years!) Today we excerpt from Examiner.com some news that follows up our Ebola story and exclusive interview with public health expert Vince Silenzio […]

Ebola: And Senegal Makes Five Read More 👉

“Origami Robots” Self-Construct And Start Working

If you haven’t seen the origami robot yet, you’re in for a fantastic surprise! Evoking the potential of an ancient and wonderful Japanese art, these crawling robots can self-assemble from flat-pack designs and autonomously perform. Inspired by self-assembly in nature—such as the way complex proteins with sophisticated functions derive from folding linear sequences of amino

“Origami Robots” Self-Construct And Start Working Read More 👉

What's "Sustainable Development"? Free Online Course!

On his blog “I see a change,” Nigerian Youth Development Expert Olumide Idowu presents the elements of sustainable development (source: olumideidowu.blog.com). Not all online courses provide all they promise you, but here’s one that should answer all your questions about environmentally sustainable, socially inclusive economic development. It will also challenge you to find out more.

What's "Sustainable Development"? Free Online Course! Read More 👉

Long-jawed Croc Fossil Comes To Life In 3-D, Full-color, Micro Detail

Thoracosaurus neocesariensis, a fossil crocodile that lived 65 million to 100 million years ago, when the oceans were higher, in the ancient warm, carbon-dioxide-rich mangrove swamps of present-day southern New Jersey. Crocodiles have been chasing fish for a very, very long time–since the Late Cretaceous, in fact–says paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara of Philadelphia’s Drexel University. The

Long-jawed Croc Fossil Comes To Life In 3-D, Full-color, Micro Detail Read More 👉

New Antarctic Geological Timeline Sheds Light On Future Sea Level Rise

Understanding the future of sea-level rise has been at the forefront of climate scientists’ minds for years now, and new research studying fossilised marine animals found in Antarctica’s seabed sediments are providing new clues as to what we might expect from a melting Antarctica. The immediate conclusion of the research is that the melting changes

New Antarctic Geological Timeline Sheds Light On Future Sea Level Rise Read More 👉

Links Between Climate Change and Drought Not as Cut and Dried

The natural conclusion is that as global warming gets worse so too will the droughts. We’ve even had evidence of it, right? Droughts in Australia, the US, and horribly dry conditions throughout Europe. However, new research from Princeton University and the Australian National University in Canberra suggest things may not be as cut and dried

Links Between Climate Change and Drought Not as Cut and Dried Read More 👉

Greenland Winds Affect Ocean Circulation in North Atlantic

  A new climate diagnostic tool has revealed gale-force winds whipping around the Greenland coast are driving ocean circulation by affecting ocean waters, deep sea currents and sea ice behaviour. “We now have a more complete understanding of the complexity of the climate system,” says Moore, a professor in the Department of Chemical and Physical

Greenland Winds Affect Ocean Circulation in North Atlantic Read More 👉

Removing Sea Defences Could Reduce Impact of Flooding on Coastal Regions

  It might sound counter-intuitive, but a new study has shown that removing sea defences and allowing natural erosion may in fact in times of rising sea level flooding. Robert Nicholls, Professor of Coastal Engineering at the University of Southampton and co-author of this study, says the research shows that protecting our coastline from erosion simply

Removing Sea Defences Could Reduce Impact of Flooding on Coastal Regions Read More 👉

Starlight and "Air Glow" Reveal the Nighttime Cloudy Sky from Space

Scientists are excited over an inadvertent discovery using instruments aboard the new Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, a joint venture between NASA and NOAA. The satellite is actually sensitive enough to detect clouds and other objects in the nighttime sky from space, what to the human eye would simply be complete darkness. Such a discovery

Starlight and "Air Glow" Reveal the Nighttime Cloudy Sky from Space Read More 👉

Wind Power Can Meet Demand and Not Affect the Global Climate

A new study conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has found that there is more than enough power in our planet’s winds to be a primary source of near zero emissions, but that also the power generation necessary to support current and future demand would not substantially affect the climate. Climate scientists and collaborators

Wind Power Can Meet Demand and Not Affect the Global Climate Read More 👉

Warming Earth Results in Contrasting Consequences, But Not So Fast

New research by scientists has found that biodiversity on Earth actually increases as the planet warms. However, importantly, this growth is observed in the evolution of new species over millions of years and is most often accompanied by the extinction of other species.

The present trend of accelerated warming is not likely to boost global biodiversity, rather, it is set to destroy it.

Warming Earth Results in Contrasting Consequences, But Not So Fast Read More 👉

Eastern Pacific Barrier Is Virtually Impassable by Coral Species, Darwin Was Right

Charles Darwin was right, again, but this time his predictions focused on a somewhat different genre than we normally associate with the man; this time, it’s the ocean. Researchers have found that Darwin may in fact have been right on the money when he labelled the Eastern Pacific Barrier (EPB) “impassable” in the 1880s. The

Eastern Pacific Barrier Is Virtually Impassable by Coral Species, Darwin Was Right Read More 👉

Nobel Prize Winning Scientists Links Extreme Weather to Global Warming

The 244th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has already revealed several big stories regarding alternative fuels for transport, but it has also given Nobel Prize winning scientist, Mario J. Molina, Ph.D. a platform from which to explain why he believes there is new scientific proof linking extreme weather to climate change. “People may not

Nobel Prize Winning Scientists Links Extreme Weather to Global Warming Read More 👉

Pollen and Charcoal Document Ancient Egypt's Climate History

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey studying ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt’s Nile Delta have documented the region’s ancient droughts and fires, including a massive drought that happened approximately 4,200 years ago and is thought to have seen the demise of Egypt’s Old Kingdom. “Humans have a long history

Pollen and Charcoal Document Ancient Egypt's Climate History Read More 👉

Tibetan Plateau May be Older than Previously Thought

The Tibetan Plateau is the planet’s highest and largest plateau and has been the focus of scientific study for decades. In a new study, published online in the journal Nature Geoscience, researchers have discovered that the growth of high topography such as the Tibetan mountains and plateau began much earlier than was previously understood. “Most researchers

Tibetan Plateau May be Older than Previously Thought Read More 👉

Tropical Cyclones Intensify When They Hit Freshwater

A new study has been published which analyses a decade’s worth of tropical cyclones and found that, when a hurricane blows over ocean regions high in freshwater content, it can unexpectedly intensify.

The probability that a hurricane will ever encounter such conditions is relatively low, ranging from 10 to 23 percent, but the effect when it does happen is relatively large: Hurricanes can intensify by up to 50 percent.

Tropical Cyclones Intensify When They Hit Freshwater Read More 👉

Planet Earth Still Absorbing Half of our Greenhouse Gases

Planet Earth’s oceans, forests, and other assorted ecosystems are continuing to soak up approximately half the carbon dioxide we humans pump into the atmosphere every day, even as those emissions continue to increase, once again belying the very little knowledge we currently have of our planet. “Globally, these carbon dioxide ‘sinks’ have roughly kept pace

Planet Earth Still Absorbing Half of our Greenhouse Gases Read More 👉

Rise in Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Follow One Another Closely

New research from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen has shown that the rise in temperature after the last ice age into the warmer intergrlacial period was followed closely by a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide, contrary to previously held opinion. The research was published in the journal Climate of the Past and showed

Rise in Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Follow One Another Closely Read More 👉

Largest Research Expedition of its Kind Near the Site of Deepwater Horizon Incident

Following the catastrophic explosion and subsequent spill of oil from the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, scientists have embarked upon a 3-week expedition aboard the R/V Walton Smith to determine how surface ocean currents near the site influence the fate and transport of pollutants. This research is an important next step in understanding

Largest Research Expedition of its Kind Near the Site of Deepwater Horizon Incident Read More 👉

Scroll to Top