insects

Silent Spring Was Published Back In 1962 β€” Flying-Insect & Bird Populations Have Still Fallen Precipitously Since Then

Rachel Carson’s influential book Silent Spring, which documented the effects of the indiscriminate widespread use of pesticides on the environment, was published back in 1962, nearly 60 years ago now. Since that time, the book has often been cited as one of the drivers behind environmental action and regulation of various kinds. Following the release, […]

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National Climate Assessment Pulls No Punches About US Options

(All figures are from the 2014 National Climate Assessment draft.) Later today (Tuesday, May 6), at 8 a.m. EDT, the National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee of experts meets by conference call to approve the final version of the Third National Climate Assessment. The gist of their message, as Suzanne Goldenberg of The Guardian

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138 Beetle Species Discovered

138 new beetle species from Central and South America were identified last month by the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History researchers Michael Caterino and Alexey Tishechkin. Specimens were gathered from Argentina, Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, Panama,Β  Brazil, Ecuador, and Peru. Analysis of the male genitalia helpedΒ  the researchers identify the different species. In forests,

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Saving Yasuni Forest, "Megadiversity" Hotspot, Faces Funding Challenge

Yasuni National Park, located 250 km inland along the Eastern most border of Ecuador, is a world record holder in biodiversity richness:Β  The roughly 10,000 kmΒ² forest is home to 139 species of amphibians (besting Columbia’s Leticia Park with its 98 species) and an estimated 100,000 species of insects. This latter figure represents the highest

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Climate Change to Bring Plagues of Insects?

New research from the National Science Foundation suggests a warming Earth could mean a significant increase in voracious, plant-eating insects. Scientists studying the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a period about 55 million years ago when global carbon dioxide levels spiked rapidly, found that plant fossils from that time show noticeably more insect damage than plants

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