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Rain Tunnel Technology Provides Drinking Water From Air

New technology from Bangalore promises clean drinking water by drawing moisture from the air.  Rain Tunnel Technology, invented by Dr Rajah Vijay Kumar, Chief Scientific Officer at the De Scalene Research Organization, will soon be available for both commercial and household use. Getting water from the atmosphere is not new. It has been around for more […]

August 3rd

EnergyBar 100 Provides Long Life With Green Battery Technology

AspectSolar, an innovator in Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) solar-powered batteries, has announced an industry-leading, environmentally friendly and portable power solution for every aspect of work, play and home. With a lightweight and compact design, the EnergyBar 100 affords users twice the battery life of similar products and up to five times the duration of traditional […]

July 29th

First US Power-to-Gas Plants Open in California and Colorado

Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) is bringing science fiction to life, launching two demonstration projects to create and test a carbon-free, power-to-gas system for the first time ever in the U.S. The technology converts electricity into gaseous energy and could provide North America with a large-scale, cost-effective solution for storing excess energy produced from renewable […]

April 24th

Ebola: And Senegal Makes Five

As you may know, PlanetSave posts important health stories as well as the popular science, nature, and climate reports we’re usually known for. (In fact, we’re working toward 500 health posts over these few years!) Today we excerpt from Examiner.com some news that follows up our Ebola story and exclusive interview with public health expert Vince Silenzio […]

September 1st

World Time Calculator, or “Dial-a-Time”

Here’s one of the funniest ways to tell world time that I have ever seen. I call it “Dial-a-Time,” although that’s not the official name for it. (The official name is “xkcd.com/1335/”.) First of all, with this graphic you have to get used to the fact that you are looking at the world from Antarctica […]

August 15th

“Origami Robots” Self-Construct And Start Working

If you haven’t seen the origami robot yet, you’re in for a fantastic surprise! Evoking the potential of an ancient and wonderful Japanese art, these crawling robots can self-assemble from flat-pack designs and autonomously perform. Inspired by self-assembly in nature—such as the way complex proteins with sophisticated functions derive from folding linear sequences of amino […]

August 10th

Review: The Long Shadow Of Chernobyl

Though we try to keep a very positive focus here, PlanetSave isn’t just a blog about the wonders of the natural world and the glory of Mankind’s inventions. It also offers knowledge and a caution about our failures as individuals and as a species. We’ve all made mistakes before, big and small. By acknowledging anthropogenic […]

March 20th

What's "Sustainable Development"? Free Online Course!

On his blog “I see a change,” Nigerian Youth Development Expert Olumide Idowu presents the elements of sustainable development (source: olumideidowu.blog.com). Not all online courses provide all they promise you, but here’s one that should answer all your questions about environmentally sustainable, socially inclusive economic development. It will also challenge you to find out more. […]

January 24th

"Return To Fukushima" Airs This Week

It’s not too late to catch America Tonight‘s exclusive four-part series, Return to Fukushima. The television special delves into real-world impacts of the nuclear disaster, industry and government efforts to mitigate the damage done, and how any ongoing fallout could affect the safety of Americans. Last night’s installment dealt with the ghost towns the Japanese […]

January 7th

Long-jawed Croc Fossil Comes To Life In 3-D, Full-color, Micro Detail

Thoracosaurus neocesariensis, a fossil crocodile that lived 65 million to 100 million years ago, when the oceans were higher, in the ancient warm, carbon-dioxide-rich mangrove swamps of present-day southern New Jersey. Crocodiles have been chasing fish for a very, very long time–since the Late Cretaceous, in fact–says paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara of Philadelphia’s Drexel University. The […]

September 30th

Titan Is Perpetually Being Swept Clean By Dunes

Using observations from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn, researchers from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center have discovered that Titan — Saturn’s largest moon — has dunes of hydrocarbon sand which are slowly but steadily filling the impact craters left on the moon’s surface, giving it a deceptively younger appearance than its brothers and […]

January 17th

New Antarctic Geological Timeline Sheds Light On Future Sea Level Rise

Understanding the future of sea-level rise has been at the forefront of climate scientists’ minds for years now, and new research studying fossilised marine animals found in Antarctica’s seabed sediments are providing new clues as to what we might expect from a melting Antarctica. The immediate conclusion of the research is that the melting changes […]

January 17th

Monthly Heat Records Have Increased By A Factor Of Five

That temperature records are being broken at an all-time high is probably not ground breaking news to anyone who has been paying a modicum of attention to the news lately. However the rate at which we have been breaking records is frighteningly distressing. According to new research, monthly temperature extremes have become much more frequent, […]

January 14th

Will Arctic And sub-Arctic Mammals Survive Climate Change?

Climate changes poses a problem for many species of animal on our planet. As environments shift, animals will need to follow their preferred climate. New research points out that the current rate of climate change up until 2080 will actually benefit most mammals that currently live in northern Europe’s Arctic and sub-Arctic land areas, but […]

January 14th

Magma Forms Deeper than Previously Thought

New research results from a team led by geologist Rajdeep Dasgupta of Rice University have shown that magma forms much deeper than geologists had previously thought. The scientists put minute samples of peridotite – a rock derived from Earth’s mantle – under very high pressures in a laboratory and found that the rock can and does liquify […]

January 9th

Scientists Drill Through Antarctica's Ice to Bedrock

Science is awesome! A team of scientists made up from nine separate countries and led by Victoria University have successfully drilled through 760 metres of ice to reach bedrock on the Antarctic island of Roosevelt Island in the Ross Sea. The project was led by Dr. Nancy Bertler of Victoria University’s Antarctic Research Centre and […]

January 7th

Links Between Climate Change and Drought Not as Cut and Dried

The natural conclusion is that as global warming gets worse so too will the droughts. We’ve even had evidence of it, right? Droughts in Australia, the US, and horribly dry conditions throughout Europe. However, new research from Princeton University and the Australian National University in Canberra suggest things may not be as cut and dried […]

January 7th

Greenland Winds Affect Ocean Circulation in North Atlantic

  A new climate diagnostic tool has revealed gale-force winds whipping around the Greenland coast are driving ocean circulation by affecting ocean waters, deep sea currents and sea ice behaviour. “We now have a more complete understanding of the complexity of the climate system,” says Moore, a professor in the Department of Chemical and Physical […]

December 21st

Stronger Snowfall Increases Ice Loss on Antarctica

  Here’s one of those science stories that seem to make no sense on the surface: according to new research Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) increased snowfall over Antarctica as a result of climate change is actually countered by an increase in ice-flow to the ocean, up to three times. Thus, Antarctica’s contribution […]

December 12th

Removing Sea Defences Could Reduce Impact of Flooding on Coastal Regions

  It might sound counter-intuitive, but a new study has shown that removing sea defences and allowing natural erosion may in fact in times of rising sea level flooding. Robert Nicholls, Professor of Coastal Engineering at the University of Southampton and co-author of this study, says the research shows that protecting our coastline from erosion simply […]

December 3rd

Columbia Glacier Expected to Stop Retreating in 2020

The spectacular Columbia Glacier in Alaska is expected to halt its retreat in 2020 when it reaches a new stable position approximately 15 miles upstream from the stable position it had held prior the 1980s. Currently 425 square miles, the multi-branched Columbia Glacier will halt at a new stable position in 2020, and measuring in […]

November 27th

Predicting Environmental Collapse

Predicting when an ecosystem is likely to collapse has benefits for foretelling crises in agriculture, fisheries and even social systems, and scientists from the University of Southampton in the UK are pioneering a new technique that may be able to do just that. The research applies a mathematical model to a real world situation, in […]

November 20th