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Kirigami Inspires New Solar Cell Technology

Researchers at the University of Michigan have created a lattice-like solar cell that can stretch like an accordion, allowing it to tilt along the sun’s trajectory and capture more energy.  The details of the oddly shaped solar film, inspired by the Japanese art of paper cutting called kirigami, are in a paper recently published in […]

October 15th

The IPCC's Blockbuster 5th Climate Assessment

BREAKING: Late this evening (8 pm EST, or tomorrow, March 31, at 9 am in Tokyo), something large and unpleasant will hit the fan about climate change. At a press conference in Yokohama, the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will release its Fifth Assessment Report on impacts of human activities on current and […]

March 30th

Review: The Long Shadow Of Chernobyl

Though we try to keep a very positive focus here, PlanetSave isn’t just a blog about the wonders of the natural world and the glory of Mankind’s inventions. It also offers knowledge and a caution about our failures as individuals and as a species. We’ve all made mistakes before, big and small. By acknowledging anthropogenic […]

March 20th

Los Angeles Council Unanimously Puts Off Fracking

When the hydraulic fracturing measure passed the Los Angeles City Council today, several tweeters posted photos of this meeting (source of the above: Walker Foley on twitter). The City Council of Los Angeles, second-most populous metro in the United States, voted 10-0 today to prohibit hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) and other “unconventional” deep-underground drilling methods to produce […]

March 1st

What's "Sustainable Development"? Free Online Course!

On his blog “I see a change,” Nigerian Youth Development Expert Olumide Idowu presents the elements of sustainable development (source: olumideidowu.blog.com). Not all online courses provide all they promise you, but here’s one that should answer all your questions about environmentally sustainable, socially inclusive economic development. It will also challenge you to find out more. […]

January 24th

International Radio Broadcast Equivocal About Geoengineering

In a spot aired this afternoon called “Geoengineers: Who will rule the climate?” the world’s third largest radio station, Voice of Russia, seems to be wobbling on whether or not wholesale scientific experimentation could alter the destructive path of anthropomorphic climate change. VOR, reportedly the first radio station to broadcast internationally, serves about 109 million listeners of […]

January 23rd

Great Barrier Reef Gets A Six-Week Reprieve From Big Coal

The Great Barrier Reef on November 8, 2010, from the orbit of the European Space Agency’s now-inoperative Envisat satellite, the largest civilian Earth observation instrument put into space. An uncivil war of words, money, and influence has broken out in Australia between the coal industry, which is favored by government, and the nation’s environmental interests. […]

December 21st

New HIV/AIDS A3/02 Strain Faster, Deadlier

“Determining the HIV-1 subtype of infected individuals could be important in the management of HIV-1 infections,” say A3/O2 study authors.‪ (Photo: GIZMODO) Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, appears to have generated the newest strain of the HIV/AIDS virus. In recent years, health experts have begun to think of HIV/AIDS as a treatable, nonlethal disease. Seventeen people treated […]

December 2nd

Long-jawed Croc Fossil Comes To Life In 3-D, Full-color, Micro Detail

Thoracosaurus neocesariensis, a fossil crocodile that lived 65 million to 100 million years ago, when the oceans were higher, in the ancient warm, carbon-dioxide-rich mangrove swamps of present-day southern New Jersey. Crocodiles have been chasing fish for a very, very long time–since the Late Cretaceous, in fact–says paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara of Philadelphia’s Drexel University. The […]

September 30th

Emotional Intelligence Increased With Horses

A research study conducted at the University of Kentucky found that working with horses could increase emotional intelligence. The total number of research subjects in the study was 21, and they were all nurses. Ten were from a neuroscience surgery service unit and eleven worked in trauma and acute care at a hospital. The group […]

June 5th

97% Of Research Papers Say Global Warming Is Manmade

A recent study of research papers published from 1991 to 2011 that took a view on human-related climate change found 97% of them were in agreement that humans are a factor. The study was published in Environmental Research Letters, Volume 8, Number 2. A large team of researchers made up the study group, which had […]

May 16th

Six-Foot Robot Invades Greenland, For Science

There is nothing better in life than a good robot story, and what’s even better is when that robot is named GROVER. GROVER stands for both Greenland Rover and Goddard Remotely Operated Vehicle for Exploration and Research — which must have just really made the NASA scientists day, when they realised — and is set to […]

May 2nd

Cutting Emissions Of Certain Pollutants Could Slow Down Sea Level Rise

New research has shown that rising sea levels could be greatly slowed if certain fast cycling pollutants are cut from the numerous emissions being pumped into the atmosphere. According to the research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week, cutting levels of methane, soot, refrigerants, and gases that lead to the formation of ground-level ozone, […]

April 15th

Robot Jellyfish Could Be Powered By Seawater

Researchers at Virginia Tech, the University of Texas at Dallas and some other universities are working on the development of robotic jellyfish for a project funded by the US Navy. The propulsion mechanism for the artificial jellyfish employs hydrogen and oxygen mixed with seawater. A chemical reaction results, which causes material in the robotic jellyfish […]

April 5th

Explaining The 2011 Arctic Ozone Hole

The loss of ozone over Antarctica in the southern hemisphere is relatively well documented and popularly known, especially within Australia where for residents of southern states (like the island state of Tasmania) venturing out into the sun during summer is downright dangerous. Simply put, conditions in the Arctic — on the other side of the […]

March 12th

Antarctica Moved From Flat To Fjord 34 Million Years Ago

Often, understanding what the planet’s climate will do and why requires study into fields that we as laymen might consider irrelevant. Thankfully, there are those out there who have dedicated their lives to the sciences and are not so quick to discuss a particular field or aspect of science as irrelevant. So when geoscientists from the University […]

March 6th

Penn State Scientists Utilise Innovative Approaches In Antarctic Research

The National Science Foundation recently noted that the researchers working on the Pine Island Glacier project are one of three Antarctic science initiatives that have achieved technological milestones with innovative approaches to drilling. Specifically, in an attempt to map the cavity beneath the 37 mile long Pine Island Glacier ice shelf, Penn State graduate student […]

February 21st

Samples Taken From Isolated Antarctic Lake Beneath The Ice

An Antarctic research team has accomplished what no other team has ever accomplished previously by drilling through 800 metres (2,600 feet) of Antarctic ice to reach an isolated subglacial lake and taking water and sediment samples. Isolated from our atmosphere for thousands of years, the samples taken from the subglacial lake may have evolved in […]

January 29th