Sandy Dechert, Author at PlanetSave - Page 8 of 8

Author: Sandy Dechert

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Government Shutdown Boomerangs On U.S. Health

Everyone’s thinking about the U.S. government shutdown. American media have chosen to dramatize a health official’s suggestion that children with cancer will not be able to receive advanced clinical treatments because funds are unavailable. But the kids with cancer are only a sideshow. The most frightening health effects concern the entire nation, and by extension, […]

October 5th

Long-jawed Croc Fossil Comes To Life In 3-D, Full-color, Micro Detail

Thoracosaurus neocesariensis, a fossil crocodile that lived 65 million to 100 million years ago, when the oceans were higher, in the ancient warm, carbon-dioxide-rich mangrove swamps of present-day southern New Jersey. Crocodiles have been chasing fish for a very, very long time–since the Late Cretaceous, in fact–says paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara of Philadelphia’s Drexel University. The […]

September 30th

Make-believe "Polarization" In 1st Hearing On Climate Plan

President Obama’s Plan to Fight Climate Change has an initial Congressional hearing (whitehouse.gov). Here’s what happened: Perhaps the second great step the Obama Administration has made this year with respect to climate change–after the President’s June 25 iteration of his sketchy but essentially solid outline for a new climate plan–happened this past week. The House […]

September 30th

Shutter 1.2% Of Power Plants, Cut Carbon Costs By 20%

The nation’s most-polluting power plant, Georgia Power Company’s Plant Scherer in Juliette, Georgia, emits more carbon dioxide than all of Maine’s energy emissions. Here’s more from Environment America: On September 10, the Environment America Research & Policy Center, an independent nonprofit, and the Frontier Group presented a mighty appealing fast track toward limiting the U.S. […]

September 12th

Declining And Misused Federal Fire Dollars: The Rim Fire

“Monster” fire consumes almost 10% of Yosemite National Park, August-September 2013 (Photo: U.S. Forest Service) Annual costs of fighting wildfires have grown exponentially over the past decade. They now surpass the value of resources reclaimed. The Rim Fire burning in and near Yosemite National Park has already cost over $65 million, and it is less […]

September 2nd

Egyptian Tomb Bats Carry MERS Coronavirus

We still don’t know how humans acquire Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS, formerly known as “n-coronavirus”). The mortality rate among people treated for MERS is 65%, making it one of the most lethal coronaviruses identified to date. However, scientists from the Ministry of Health of Saudi Arabia, the Center for Infection and Immunity of Columbia […]

August 23rd

Obama Repeats Keystone XL Cautions

Reposted from Examiner.com: In his weekly address on Saturday, President Barack Obama singled out highlights of his hour-long remarks Wednesday at high-ranked Knox liberal arts college in Galesburg, Illinois. President Obama recalled his plan of “a better bargain for the middle class and folks working to join it.” In Galesburg, he also reconfirmed the commitment […]

July 29th

Cyclospora Outbreak May Have Peaked Already

Reposted from Examiner.com: A new stomach bug has arrived in the USA — but it might already be on its way out. As of Friday afternoon, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had received notifications of 285 cases of Cyclospora infection — about twice our annual average — in residents of 11 states, mainly in […]

July 29th

Obesity Research Breakthrough

Reposted from Examiner.com: Most of us have never heard of ghrelin (pronounced GRELL-in). The hormone has made headline news because a study published [this week] has explained how it interacts with FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated protein), the gene that researchers first linked to obesity in 2007. Here’s a closer look at the details of the new discovery. While only […]

July 17th

Runaway Oil Train Causes Deadly Explosion In Eastern Quebec

At about 1:15 Saturday morning, a 72-freightcar train carrying crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken shale development, bound for Irving Oil’s plant in Saint John, New Brunswick, slipped its brakes in the eastern Quebec town of Nantes. The train’s only human passenger — the engineer — had checked into a nearby hotel. Driverless and continually […]

July 10th