Taiwan VP Is Committed To 20% Renewable Energy Target

The Taiwan government is targeting generating 20% of the nation’s electricity from renewable sources by 2025. According to Taiwan Today, vice president Chen Chien-jen says this represents a boost to the green energy industry and a transition to a nuclear-free nation.

taiwan-night-marketTo achieve its target, the government plans a substantial investment of NT$1.2 trillion (US$38 billion). The investment target is increasing the nation’s solar power capacity to 20 gigawatts, or 250 billion kilowatt-hours. Chen stated this at the opening of the annual Taiwan International Photovoltaic Exhibition (PV Taiwan) in Taipei City.

“Moving toward to a nuclear-free country is a key motivation for developing Taiwan’s green energy industry, but it is not the only one,” the vice president said. “Another crucial factor is that green energy is an emerging sector with the potential to generate major business opportunities for the nation.”

Green energy is among five innovative industries targeted for strategic promotion under a comprehensive industrial restructuring program launched by the administration of President Tsai Ing-wen. The four others are biotech and pharmaceuticals, national defense, smart machinery, and the Internet of Things and other smart technologies.

Chen pointed to Taiwan, a leading global producer of devices such as LED lighting and solar panels, as being well-positioned to serve as an international research hub in this area. “If we can pool our resources and focus on bolstering the industry, the nation could become a center of green energy innovation and R&D in the Asia-Pacific region.”

Another goal of the renewable energy program is to boost Taiwan’s energy self-sufficiency rate, which is currently just 3%, the vice president said. This would enable the nation to reduce the almost NT$2 trillion it spends on importing energy annually, he added.

According to the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taiwan generates 4 percent of its power from renewable resources such as hydroelectric, solar and wind, with the overall capacity of solar and onshore wind power facilities standing at 1 gigawatt and 671 megawatts, respectively. In addition to establishing new solar power plants, the government is working to boost the nation’s renewable energy resources by building offshore wind turbines off the island’s western coast.

Image via Google Creative Commons


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is a writer, producer, and director. Meyers is editor and site director of Green Building Elements, a contributor to CleanTechnica, and founder of Green Streets MediaTrain, a communications connection and eLearning hub. As an independent producer, he's been involved in the development, production and distribution of television and distance learning programs for both the education industry and corporate sector. He also is an avid gardener and loves sustainable innovation.