China Oil Pipeline Explodes, Killing 35, Injuring Hundreds, As Port Catches Fire

  • Published on November 25th, 2013

Qingdao pipeline explosion

On Friday morning, November 22, an underground oil pipeline running through the Chinese port city of Qingdao began leaking, prompting its shutdown. Initial reports state that the underground pipeline exploded shortly after the shut down (at approximately 10:30am) — killing at least 35 people and injuring another 166, according to the most recent counts.

An early investigations by city officials stated that the initial leaked oil flowed into the municipal (electrical) grid, causing the explosion

The explosion resulted in the spillage of an unknown volume of oil into the city’s port. Shortly thereafter, the port spill ignited and resulted in at least two additional explosions.

The early morning explosions and port fire temporarily shut down one of China’s largest oil import terminals which processes 240,000 barrels per day of imported crude. However, an unknown port official was quoted as saying: “The port was not affected by the pipeline blast, but tankers were told to sail away from the port as a safety precaution.” [Reuters]

The pipeline is owned by oil refiner Sinopec Corp (one of the nation’s largest refining companies) and connects Huangdao to Weifang, two industrial cities in the northeastern province of Shangdong. The pipeline supplies oil to several refineries.

According to a Reuters report, the pipeline explosion blasted a hole in a residential road that swallowed at least one truck and allowed oil to seep into utility pipes beneath the city. The Qingdao Environmental Protection Bureau reported that oil and gas that had spilled onto the sea surface had caught fire, covering an area estimated at 32,000 square feet. By late Friday, barriers had been set up to contain the spill and prevent it from spreading further.

Dalian opil spill 2010_AP10073018620-638x423

China state news agency Xinhua issued a statement from China president Xi Jinping, which called on local authorities “spare no effort to rescue the injured and strengthen safety to eradicate such incidents.” [quote via this Reuters report]

The last reports on the situation indicated that the spill is being contained but the full details of the spill have not been release as of yet. The impact on local marine life has not yet been assessed. However, the magnitude of the spill appears to be considerably less that China’s last major oil spill which occurred in 2010 in the northeastern port of Dalian (see photo, above right). That spill released somewhere between 18 and 27 million gallons of crude oil into the Yellow Sea, which is comparable to the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

Souce material for this post came from the Think Progress/AP article ‘Oil Pipeline Explodes In China, Killing 35 And Setting The Ocean On Fire by Andrew Breiner

Additional material came from the Reuters post ‘Sinopec oil pipeline blast kills 35 in eastern China’ by By Chen Aizhu

Top photo: A man stands next to an overturned car on a street damaged by an explosion at a Sinopec Corp oil pipeline in Qingdao, Shandong province, November 22, 2013. Credit: Reuters/China Daily

Bottom photo: A worker cleans up after China’s 2010 Dalian oil spill. CREDIT: ASSOCIATED PRESS

 


Keep up to date with all the most interesting green news on the planet by subscribing to our (free) Planetsave newsletter.






About the Author

Michael Ricciardi is a well-published writer of science/nature/technology articles as well as essays, poetry and short fiction. Michael has interviewed dozen of scientists from many scientific fields, including Brain Greene, Paul Steinhardt, Arthur Shapiro, and Nobel Laureate Ilya Progogine (deceased). Michael was trained as a naturalist and taught natural science on Cape Cod, Mass. from 1986-1991. His first arts grant was for production of the environmental (video) documentary 'The Jones River - A Natural History', 1987-88 (Kingston, Mass.). Michael is an award winning, internationally screened video artist. Two of his more recent short videos; 'A Time of Water Bountiful' and 'My Name is HAM' (an "imagined memoir" about the first chimp in space), and several other short videos, can be viewed on his website (http://www.chaosmosis.net). He is also the author of the ebook 'Zombies, E.T's, and The Super Entity - A Selection of Most Stimulating Articles' and for Kindle: Artful Survival ~ Creative Options for Chaotic Times