Health

Published on February 22nd, 2013 | by Michael Ricciardi

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New Class of Molecular Compounds That Kill the Influenza Virus Discovered

February 22nd, 2013 by

scientists

Building upon previous research that revealed a method of manipulating a key viral replication enzyme, an international group of virologists have discovered a new class of compounds that are capable of killing the influenza virus.

It is hoped that the new compounds will lead to the development of anti-influenza drugs that the virus strains can’t adapt to and/or resist as easily as they do Tamiful — an anti-influenza drug that is becoming less and less effective due to the virus’ ability to rapidly mutate and thus adapt to the drugs.

Tamiful and another anti-influenza drug, Relenza, work by disrupting the activity of the viral enzyme neuraminidase (the ‘N’ in viral designations, such as H1N1); the enzyme helps the virus to detach from an infected cell’s surface by digesting a cell surface sugar called sialic acid. This same sugar is used by the virus to help it stick to a cell’s surface prior to it invading the new cell where it can begin replicating.

Acting on the premise that ‘too much of a good thing can be deadly’ (for the virus that is), the scientists decided to exploit this viral mechanism by “gumming” it up, so to speak.

The newly discovered compounds are able to block, or “clog up” this normal neuraminidase activity — stopping the enzyme from dissolving the surface sugar which in turn prevents the virus from detaching itself and escaping to infect another health cell.

Neuraminidases, also called sialidases, catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal sialic acid residues from the newly formed virions and from the host cell receptors.[1] Sialidase activities include assistance in the mobility of virus particles through the respiratory tract mucus and in the elution of virion progeny from the infected cell

(ribbon diagram) Neuraminidases, also called sialidases, catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal sialic acid residues from the newly formed virions and from the host cell receptors. Sialidase activities include assistance in the mobility of virus particles through the respiratory tract mucus and in the elution of virion progeny from the infected cell

These new sialic acid analogues — termed neuraminidase inhibitors — are also more effective because they are water soluble; after being taken orally, they more easily localize to a patient’s throat where the flu virus is replicating.

In a press release, Masahiro Niikura, research team member and associate professor of Health Science at Simon Fraser University, stated:

“Influenza develops resistance to Replenza less frequently, but it’s not the drug of choice like Tamiful because it’s not water-soluble and has to be taken as a nasal spray. Our new compounds are structurally more similar to sialic acid than Tamiful. We expect this closer match will make it much more difficult for influenza to adapt to new drugs.”

And, quoting from the paper’s abstract:

“These compounds function in cell-based assays and in animal models, with efficacies comparable to that of the neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir and with broad spectrum activity against drug-resistant strains in vitro. The similarity of their structure to that of the natural substrate and their mechanism-based design make these attractive antiviral candidates.”

The study, detailing the newly discovered compounds and how they work, was published on-line, Feb. 21, in the journal Science Express under the title: ‘Mechanism-Based Covalent Neuraminidase Inhibitors with Broad Spectrum Influenza Antiviral Activity’

Top photo: ‘Simon Fraser University virologist Masahiro Niikura and his doctoral student Nicole Bance have helped find a new enemy capable of killing the potentially deadly and always changing influenza virus’ – credit: SFU Public Affairs and Media Relations

For more information on this discovery, contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca at Simon Fraser University

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About the Author

Michael Ricciardi is a well-published writer of science/nature/technology articles as well as essays, poetry and short fiction. Michael has interviewed dozen of scientists from many scientific fields, including Brain Greene, Paul Steinhardt, Arthur Shapiro, and Nobel Laureate Ilya Progogine (deceased). Michael was trained as a naturalist and taught natural science on Cape Cod, Mass. from 1986-1991. His first arts grant was for production of the environmental (video) documentary 'The Jones River - A Natural History', 1987-88 (Kingston, Mass.). Michael is an award winning, internationally screened video artist. Two of his more recent short videos; 'A Time of Water Bountiful' and 'My Name is HAM' (an "imagined memoir" about the first chimp in space), and several other short videos, can be viewed on his website (http://www.chaosmosis.net). He is also the author of the ebook 'Zombies, E.T's, and The Super Entity - A Selection of Most Stimulating Articles' and for Kindle: Artful Survival ~ Creative Options for Chaotic Times



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