Disasters & Extreme Weather 4589270904_e5ba3c3918

Published on August 6th, 2011 | by Shellee Tyler

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Fukushima Radiation So High, Geiger Counter Can't Register It! {Video}

August 6th, 2011 by

Japan suffered one of the biggest nuclear disasters just 5 months ago. Now, instead of things getting better, they are getting worse, much worse.

The Fukushima nuclear power plant, the epicenter of the earthquake-tsunami disaster, according to TEPCO, the company that owns the plant, now has radiation levels six times higher than the highest level they have ever record before.

TEPCO reported that radiation levels are over 10,000 millisieverts per hour on the second floor of reactor one. The problem with that report is that Geiger counters can’t measure past 10,000 millisieverts per hour.

So, how high is the radiation level on the second floor of reactor one?

Before the disaster, the maximum amount of radiation a reactor employee was allowed to be exposed to was 100 millisieverts. After the disaster it was increased to 250 millisieverts.

With radiation levels over 10,ooo millisieverts it could possibly kill a man in a matter seconds, if directly exposed to the radiation. With levels off the Geiger counter chart, TEPCO is basically unable to resolve the disaster.

This could be why they recently updated their recovery plan. They removed the idea of plugging the holes and cracks in the containment vessels of the reactors.

Some analysis claims it may take over 30 years for any progress to be made at Fukushima. Question is, do we have 30 years to wait? There seems to be no solution brought forth on how to stop the radiation or how bad it is actually affecting the earth.

It seems no one wants to address the seriousness of this global problem. Levels this high cannot be good and it is more than likely spreading farther than is being reported.

So, what’s at risk? The air we breathe, the water we drink,  the food we eat, and, most of all, our overall health.

h/t: gaia health

Photo Credit: marcos papapopolus

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  • http://www.geigercounterkits.com Radiation Man

    The Japanese may be useless at clearing up the nuclear and radioactive mess they made at Fukushima, but they have clearly proved themselves masters at blocking any news getting out of Japan! Any so-called ‘bad news’ is classified as ‘false news’ and it is now illegal to report it in Japan.

    • http://Web Vicki

      I absolutely believe everything you have said. Information is becoming so hard to find and the disaster website RSOE EDIS out of Hungary quit updating their situation updates on August 3rd, 2011, plus all the older updates have disappeared, but I saved all of them to my email if anyone is interested in seeing them. They were updating the info on Fukushima Daiichi several times a day and now… nothing. Here is the link to that site: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php You will need to enlarge the map to be able to click on Japan and the little “hand” will let you bring up only the last three “situation updates” about the meltdowns (just click on the “radioactive symbol”).

  • http://Web Vicki

    Oh, I just love the way this news has dried up. Talk about a cover-up and it happened right after all the people raced to buy the potassium iodide to block the intake of I-131 found in the U.S. air. It’s unfortunate that people don’t realize that potassium iodide doesn’t work for the other isotopes being pumped out of the Fukushima reactors such as plutonium 239, cesium 137, strontium 90, uranium, cobalt 60 and many others. This plume of radiation is seriously affecting the west coast of the U.S., but is spreading all the way tthrough Europe. I think it is highly irresponsible of our governments to hide this info from the public. One has to really search for information about this disaster and seeing how most people have such short memory spans, it is easy to see why they might want to forget something like this.

  • Pingback: Worst Idea Ever: Tiny Nuke Reactor in Your Back Yard (video) – Gas 2.0

  • http://www.hummingbird-guide.com Ruth

    This is really the saddest news. Why do we not hear about this on the news.Are the Nuclear Power plants being protected. As someone who lived near Three Mile Island when the disaster occured , I can speak form experience. Most people have blinders on.they feel helpless and are afraid to face the truth.Thank you for the honesty of this article. We should not fear the, truth and only truth can be our guide to a better.safer future.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      Thanks. & I agree :D

  • http://Web Uncle B

    China now spending fortunes in good, strong, Yuan, and devoting a huge number of the best engineers, scientists, the Asian gene pool can render, to researching Thorium fueled LFTR reactors. Reactors that produce no humanocidal plutonium, waste products safe after only three hundred years storage, safer easy to mine, easy and safe to transport, safer to refine, much more plentiful Thorium for fuel. If and when they succeed, the Chinese government will keep the patents and proprietary secrets for themselves, not allowing Capitalists, Corporatists, to exact huge royalties for their own pockets, but to benefit China and Asia, and all humanity! LFTR reactors can form the basis, the energy supply for Pan-Eurasian bullet train networks with their humane electric powered infrastructures, to be Daisy – Chained,from Dover in England, to Finland, Siberia, Russia Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, through Spain, even to Africa’s shores! Across to Iran. Iraq, even to Turkmenistan, Tibet, to China’s seas. Imagine the Empire this would create! It would certainly dwarf anything from the U.S.!
    Can they do this? Google, Tsinghua University, pebble bed gas reactor. Then Google Thorium fueled CANDU reactor in China! Google China reactors – for more!
    U.S. nuclear industry stuck on stupid, mired by “Legacy Inertia”. They cannot afford to give up “sunk money” in current technologies, by the dictates of corporate law, and fumble in the dark with their legislators, their bankers, their investors, who dictate the technology to them, instead of the other way around, where engineers, scientists dictate, others listen – this is the quintessential American dilemma, and led to the demise of U.S. auto-making supremacy, has contributed to the flight of Capital to Asia and remains even today to stall the U.S. government, kill U.S. enterprise, choking out even the EV-1 Electric Car success ! Google the documentary, “Who Stole The Electric Car” for a substantiation of this notion!

    • http://Web Vicki

      Great point made here, Uncle B. Thanks.

  • Pingback: Fukushima Radiation Levels Higher Than Geiger Counter Can Record {Video} | WV Outpost

  • http://Web Mathew Od

    Ummm…”TEPCO reported that radiation levels are over 10,000 millisieverts per hour on the second floor of reactor one.
    Source: Planetsave (http://s.tt/12YQO)”

    Wasn’t the location recorded from a piece of rubble OUTSIDE the reactors? Supposedly part of the containment casing or building that was blown apart? And that this rubble isn’t itself releasing radiation into the air, but is just radioactive?

    I sense a lot of fear-mongering in this article…..

    • http://Web Vicki

      I sense that you need to educate yourself more about NPPs. Sorry, but this article is NOT the only one who has stated that the radiation levels are so high they cannot be recorded with normal equipment. I have read extensively about Chernobyl and when that sarcophagus goes then so do millions of people. The Ukraine is so broke they cannot afford the new $1.5 billion (US) it would take to build the new containment system and no other countries are stepping up to the plate to help pay for it.

  • http://Web Kevin Pearce

    The author and the previous comments have valid concerns but not a good understanding of radioactivity. First; detection does not mean danger. The granite counter top, the bananas in the basket and the person you sleep next to are all irradiating you. Second; when reporting something like 10,000 milli-sieverts per hour, you must supply a critical piece of information to the reader: the range. On contact, one foot, ten feet? The inverse square law applies, double the distance, quarter the dose. Third; dilution is the solution. With a few exceptions, these fuels come out of the ground. It is just concentrated. Do we want these products in the food chain, no. But public policy (ours or Japan’s) is based on societal demands and hopefully, history.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      Well, Kevin, sure banana’s do serve up a little radiation, but nothing compared to this. http://planetsave.com/2011/03/20/radiation-dose-chart-super-interesting/

      • http://Web Vicki

        Hi, Kevin. Zachary is right and that chart is really worth looking at. Now why do you think people were racing to buy potassium iodide in the U.S.? It’s because the radiation had reached our west coast and was detected all the way to Massachusetts. Radioactive iodine is the least of our worries as I mentioned in a comment above. This radiation spreads far and wide. Just ask the people in Belarus and other parts of Europe (wind drift) after Chernobyl. This accident in Japan has been rated a “7″ by the IAEA, just like Chernobyl which is the highest rating they have. AND, Chernobyl only had a meltdown of one of their reactors wheras Japan has had 3 reactor meltdowns. I’m not trying to scare anyone, but facts are facts and the truth is being hidden from the Japanese and American citizens.

  • http://Web Ski

    If we must continue with nuclear power. These plants need to be built underground. As we did with out nuclear warheads. It only makes sense, as we know there are going to be tornados and hurricanes. We need to pay the extra cost for the safety of these plants. Lastly, these precautions still could be vulnerable to earthquakes. So, hundred year floods, hundred year (almost nil) castrophes…still must be accounted for regardless.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      yes, and doing that (and not even doing that), nuclear can’t compete economically with renewable energy now.. so.. nuclear needs to be dropped

    • http://Web Vicki

      I don’t believe it is possible to build NPP’s underground. They need a ready supply of water to keep them cool. I may be wrong, though, but justthought I would mention that. Thanks.

  • http://Web Alex

    What is the status of milk, spinach and meat safety in the U.S./California. A few months ago, these foods were reported as having low levels of radiation due to the Japan disaster, but no word since then.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      yeah, i haven’t heard either.. wondering

    • http://Web Reed Rothschild

      UC Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Department been doing a great job tracking levels in their area.

      • http://Web NWReader

        Thanks for the info, Reed. It is very helpful

  • http://Web Jude

    How is it that he MEDIA can report round the clock coverage of Casey Anthony or a Utah cult case and NOT the largest nuclear disaster in history. WHY?

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      i wonder the same.. & a key reason why i’m in this work now

  • http://Web RikkiUW

    This is why nuclear power, if it is to be used at all, should be in remote areas, and more importantly, have VERY strict safety guidelines. I think this disaster will indeed be a problem for years to come. As I understand it, after Chernobyl, people were evacuated and simply could not go back to the affected area. I don’t know what the population was around the reactor before the accident, but I doubt it was as high as the area around Fukushima. Given the size and population of Japan, I doubt permanent evacuation is even possible. What then, if the problem can’t be solved? Nothing like this has ever happened, there is no precedent to draw on…

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/zshahan/ Zachary Shahan

      Agreed.. on all fronts. Nuclear power should really be dropped. No matter how rare the disasters, they are extreme — and we still have NO solution for long-term storage of waste

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