BP, Under Criminal Investigation & Violating Its Probation, Still Gets Multi-Million Dollar Government Contracts

If BP were a person (as it now is, legally, under the ridiculous Citizens United Supreme Court ruling of 2010), it would be in serious s*** right now. It is under a federal criminal investigation due to the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, and it has violated its terms of probation twice in the last year.

Despite this, though, it is still getting millions upon millions of dollars in government contracts. Can you imagine the U.S. government buying millions upon millions of dollars worth of goods from a recognized drug lord in such a position? (OK, well, nevermind….)

But, seriously, this is not right.

Last week, Jason Leopold of Truthout wrote, “the Defense Logistics Agency [recently] awarded Air BP, a division of BP Products North America, a $42 million contract to supply fuel to Dover Air Force Base for the next month and a half. BP is the biggest supplier of fuel to the Defense Department.”

Furthermore, this award was not given out under a normal bidding process. No, BP got the award without having to go up against normal competition or bidding that would lower the price of their product because the contract was identified as “an unusual and compelling urgency” contract. In other words, “the government would be ‘seriously injured‘ and national security could be at risk unless the Defense Logistics Agency was permitted to ‘limit the number of sources from which it solicits bids or proposals.'”

Offering contracts under “unusual and compelling urgency” is apparently quite common when open competition is limited by the government, according to Scott Amey, general counsel for watchdog group Project On Government Oversight (POGO).

“On POGO’s Federal Contractor Misconduct Database, BP comes in at number 48 in a list of the top 100 government contractors. But the company ranks second, behind Lockheed Martin, as having the most instances of misconduct – 53 – since 1995….”

Oh, what a nice relationship BP and the U.S. government seem to have. It’s no wonder the company is looking to get off without perhaps paying any taxes (and maybe even getting money from the government) after last year’s oil spill that “hurt them so bad.”

For more on the story above and BP’s recent probation violations, check out the full Truthout article: BP Still Being Awarded Lucrative Government Contracts.

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is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.